A Solo Traveler’s Guide to Iceland’s Blue Lagoon

Howdy, y’all! I’m currently writing from an Airbnb in Grindavik…the same little town of 3,300 that’s home to the popular Blue Lagoon!

Last time I ventured to Iceland, I stayed at the Kex Hostel in the “big city” of Reykjavik. Since I’m only in Iceland for a 20-hour layover this time around, I decided to stay local and not stray too far from KEF airport.

And, since the Blue Lagoon is just a 20-min drive from KEF, I decided to spend the day there after my arrival. Prior to coming here, most of the reviews I had read about BL were from groups or couples…so, here’s my guide for all you fellow solo travelers!

Book in Advance

I booked my ticket for the Blue Lagoon exactly one month in advance of my trip. My flight was scheduled to arrive at 10:30 AM and I wanted to give myself enough time in case of delays, etc. so I booked my Lagoon ticket for 2 PM. I also booked a shuttle in advance through Airport Direct for an added fee (you can actually add this right in when you purchase your BL ticket online). I had about an hour to kill at the airport before my 1 PM shuttle but I didn’t mind! A lot of folks encourage visiting earlier or later in the day, but the lagoon itself is huge and it didn’t feel overwhelmingly crowded at all, even in the middle of a summer afternoon!

Purchase the ‘Comfort’ Package

I read a lot of differing opinions on what type of ticket to buy for the Lagoon. To me, comfort was key. It included admission, a towel, a free drink at the swim-up bar (beer, wine, smoothie, etc.), and unlimited silica masks. The fancier package includes a robe and slippers and another type of mask but those added bits certainly aren’t necessary. Especially the mask part…more on that below.

Being Alone Isn’t Lonely

Ok, admittedly I did feel a little weird going to the Blue Lagoon alone…but I’ve done everything else alone so no big deal. Turns out, it really wasn’t! There were plenty of other solo peeps, and even folks who were with others ended up floating around, doing their own thing. There is plenty of bench seating along the interior of the lagoon, so you can just pop a squat like I did and people watch/meditate/etc.

ALSO…get chatty with the folks who work there! The lifeguards loved to talk, as did the folks doling out the mud masks in the middle of the lagoon. In fact, I struck up a great conversation with one such worker named Stefan who ended up giving me algae and lava masks for free! They were supposed to be like $10 each! Yayay!

The Showers Are NBD

I read so many posts detailing how you have to shower totally naked before entering the lagoon and folks made it sound like the showers were all open and there would be employees watching my every scrub. That wasn’t the case AT ALL. The bathrooms have individual shower stalls, complete with frosted glass, hair conditioner, and body wash. There was nothing weird about it, even for a prude American like myself. πŸ˜‚

Odds and Ends

Bring a waterproof case for your phone! I bought a cheap one on Amazon that worked perfectly. Plus, I didn’t want to risk damaging my DSLR, but I wanted a few photos to remember this experience by!

There is no limit for how long you can stay at the Blue Lagoon. Once you arrive, you can stay till closing if you want! Plus, there’s a cafe and restaurant inside to keep you satiated.

Also, ladies and gents with long hair — it’s encouraged to keep it tied up and conditioned before entering the Lagoon. The shower stalls offer a bounty of conditioner which I saturated my hair in. I didn’t rinse it out before tying my hair up and going in. My hair ended up getting wet, but it didn’t turn into straw because I had put so much conditioner in — both before and after!

One last note…be careful upon entering the lagoon itself! The floor is actually really slippery and I nearly went completely under after losing my balance walking in! I also had no one to laugh it off with (#solotravelprobs). πŸ˜‚

Have you been to the Blue Lagoon? What’d you think? Let me know!

Next stop: Edinburgh

Spread kindness and cheer, xo

Jackie

6 thoughts on “A Solo Traveler’s Guide to Iceland’s Blue Lagoon

  1. Haven’t been to the Blue Lagoon, but we were on a tour with half a dozen others who were all going there, and our driver was very dismissive of the whole experience because it was a “tourist thing” and not how real Icelanders live. He spent a lot of time talking about the origins of the man-made lagoon, the fact that it uses waste water from the power plant and it started out as a place to treat skin diseases like eczema and psoriasis. I think he enjoyed making it sound a little “icky” to the tourists. Anyway, it seems like a great place to chill, or warm up, as the case may be, just hasn’t been on my agenda yet.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve heard that too, but funnily enough I stayed with folks born and raised in Iceland and they have season passes to the lagoon! I think it’s worth it if you need to kill time during a layover since it’s so near the airport, but other than that I wouldn’t prioritize it during a trip to Iceland.

      Liked by 1 person

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